Australian Mungbean Association

Australian-grown mungbeans have quality written all over them!

Professional dedication recognised

“Getting pest and disease management right in mungbean has taken time and over the years Hugh and Malcolm have engaged with the AMA and with growers to solve problems and develop strategies that have made mungbean a far more reliable prospect for growers wanting to include a summer pulse in their crop rotations,” says AMA President, Mr Robert Anderson.

 

23 July, 2017

 

Part of the success of the mungbean industry over the last 20 years has been the invaluable support of enthusiastic professionals such as DAF Queensland senior entomologist Hugh Brier and principal plant pathologist Dr Malcolm Ryley. At the November 2014 AMA meeting both were made life members of the Association in recognition of their dedication to the development of agronomic systems for the industry.

Mr Brier has developed economic threshold for several major insect pests of mungbean, notably mirids, helicoverpa, pod borers and pod-sucking pests. One of his latest and very notable contributions to the industry is an online podsucking bugs threshold calculator for mungbean.

Dr Ryley’s research has improved the management of bacterial diseases of mungbean such as halo blight and tan spot. This has contributed to the development of new varieties with increased disease resistance, greatly reducing production risks for growers.

Both recipients of this prestigious award acknowledged the invaluable contribution of the technical teams that support their research projects. In recognition of the project team, Hugh has contributed a photo from the first major GRDC-funded Summer Pulse IPM project that shows ‘the class of 2000’ in a massive mungbean sampling trial on the Downs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left to right are: Joe Wessels, Hugh Brier, Robert Alexander and Kristen Knight.

Similarly, Jeff Tatnell and the late Michael Fullbohm, have made significant contributions to the plant pathology work in mungbean.

www.mungbean.org.au